Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012: What all Lawyers Need to Know about the new Liquor Laws (On Demand)

Recorded Seminar 1.5 CPD Hrs
At your desk or on your portable device

The impact of fast approaching changes to liquor licensing laws should not be underestimated. The changes will first affect lawyers acting for owners or purchasers of businesses or clubs which sell or supply alcohol (of which there are approximately 3,800 premises licences in Auckland alone). Secondly lawyers may be selected to sit on consent panels or may represent clients making applications or opposing licences. Changes to the alcohol legislation will have the potential to impact upon matters incidental to the work of many businesses and incorporated societies, extending to commercial leasing and some residential conveyancing transactions.

This On Demand seminar provides a brief historical context to ensure all practitioners understand the scale of the changes introduced by the Act which became effective on 19 June and 19 December 2013. Our presenters are an experienced barrister specialising in liquor licensing (among other matters) and author of a forthcoming text on the subject, together with an experienced legal counsel managing licensing responsibilities for the Auckland Council.

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Learning Outcomes  

During this On Demand seminar you will learn:

  • the key differences between the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 (the “Act”) and the Sale of Liquor Act 1989;
  • the significant regulatory changes which increase the role of local authorities;
  • understanding local authority responsibilities and powers; and
  • the potential role for lawyers and where they can add value for clients.

Who should watch

The sale and consumption of alcohol is part of the social fabric of New Zealand society. As such all lawyers whose clients or businesses supply alcohol (whether for financial gain or not), or who may oppose the supply of alcohol, would benefit from viewing this On Demand seminar.

On Demand feedback received

“On Demand recorded webinars are the way of the future”. 

“I love the convenience of being able to stay at my desk and learn!”.

“Love On Demand with the interactive CPD component. Very user friendly and I am able to do outside of normal office hours and at home”.

 

 

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Note that, purchases of On Demand items will be processed during normal business hours. This process includes sending you a password via email to enable you to access the full version.

Presenters

Alan Dormer
Barrister and Author

Prior to joining the Independent Bar, Alan was for 13 years, from the age of 26, a partner in the old Auckland firm of Nicholson Gribbin, which subsequently merged into Phillips Fox. The firm included amongst its clients a number of local authorities, an oil company and a brewery. Whilst at the firm Alan practised very largely in the fields of resource management, local government and liquor licensing. Since joining the Independent Bar his practice has been confined exclusively to the areas of practice listed above, together with electoral law.

Alan's eminence in his specialist fields is reflected in his having been:

  • an advisor to the last five Governments and the Law Commission;
  • retained by over 30 local authorities since joining the independent bar;
  • appointed as a Hearings Commissioner by nine local authorities;
  • retained by the University of Auckland and the Ministry for the Environment to teach the "Making Good Decisions" programme for Hearing Commissioners;
  • the only person to have been awarded both the RMLA's "Outstanding Person" award and the NZ Planning Institute's A.O. Glasse award for outstanding services to planning;
  • elected to three terms as President of the RMLA.

Mary Davenport
Senior Solicitor, Legal Services, Auckland Council

Mary is currently a senior solicitor with Auckland Council's Legal Services in the Litigation and Regulatory team. She provides legal and strategic advice to a wide variety of business units within Council including Council Controlled Organisations, Resource Consents and Planning, Licensing and Compliance, and Building Control.

She has also provided specialist advice to the District Licensing Agency (DLA), and was a member of Council's Alcohol Readiness team, primarily advising the inspectorate on administrative, enforcement, and decision-making processes under SSAA. Mary regularly appears for Council at the Environment Court and District Court in respect of Resource Consent appeals and regulatory prosecutions. she has also appeared for the DLA and Council CCOs at matters before the LLA (now ARLA) and the High Court, and has appeared for Council on civil matters to the Court of Appeal.
 

Chair

Dr Ken Palmer
Faculty of Law, University of Auckland